Pyrat Rum Cask 1623

Pyrat Rum Cask 1623

Pyrat Rum Cask 1623

When I found out that I would be reviewing Pyrat Rum, I was a bit apprehensive.  I first sampled Pyrat Rum, an Anguilla Rums company, about 4 years ago and it was a less then pleasant experience.  When I opened the bottle the cork was stained and extremely brittle.  Upon its removal it broke off falling back into the bottle before disintegrating into dozens of fine pieces.  Once I had gotten it mostly separated I poured myself a glass and I was instantly taken aback by a pungent orange sweetness that was immediately overtaken by an unusual and unfortunately off putting flavor that I couldn’t ever quite distinguish.  At the time, I attributed it to something having gone awry in the bottling process resulting in a mangled, discolored cork and a flavor tainted and changed for the worse.

Needless to say, it was my first and until recently only experience with the brand and I figured it was time to give them another go.  However, thanks to Fox Cigar Bar in Gilbert, this time around I was lucky enough to secure a sample of the best rum Pyrat has to offer, their illusive and expensive Cask 1623.  At least this way I would get a get Idea as to what flavor profiles Pyrat considers most desirable.

The Pyrat Cask 1623 is a blend of a number of different pot-still rums that are up to 40 years old. The nose of the rum was fairly indistinct releasing a semi sweet aroma that carried with it a hint of citrus.  However, once the rum hit my palette, its subdued sweetness was instantly transformed into a tidal wave of orange zest that commanded center stage.  Similar to a Gran Marnier, the orange flavor of the Pyrat is pointed and potent.   Unfortunately, not long after the orange note began it was quickly whisked away by the same unusual and off putting aftertaste that perplexed me my first time around with Pyrat.  However, this time I noticed that the palette offending note reminded me of an over-caramelized molasses.

The finish is almost cloyingly sweet in flavor and unfortunately it’s that profile that comprises the majority of the rum.  It was smooth and I’ll give it that, but at nearly $30.00 per ounce ($250.00 per bottle), it’s so lackluster and expensive, it would be hard to justify the purchase.  All in all, I can unequivocally say that Pyrat Rum is just not for me.  Others on the Cigar Brief staff were not nearly as disappointed with the Cask 1632 as I was, but even then the rum received very few positive accolades.  If you ask me, this is one Pyrat that should have been left on the desolate beach of a deserted island.  Even better yet, buried in a shallow grave.

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